16-Year-Old With Missing Chromosome Stands Tall at 7’4″

According to the New York Post, 16-year-old Brandon Marshall from the UK stands tall at a whopping 7′ 4″, possibly making him the tallest teen currently in the world. His height coupled with his basketball skills has allowed him to carry out his dream. He’s currently receiving national attention for the sport.

Marshall might still be growing and many doctors are still baffled to how he reached this height. They are still searching for an answer and Addenbrooke’s hospital continues to conduct tests. For some time, doctors conducted several tests to see if it was related to a genetic rare disease called Marfan syndrome. Marfan is known to show symptoms of longer limbs. Yet, the test results determined that he didn’t have Marfan syndrome.
Some tests revealed that Marshall was missing his chromosome 12, which is the chromosome responsible for stopping height. His mother, Lynne Quelch, thinks a mutated gene is responsible for his unusual height. It’s something they plan to look into further– this situation is so rare that there is just one other recorded instance. Medically though, Marshall is doing alright and deals with the struggles of being a super tall boy in his day to day life. Dealing with fitting into certain rooms with low ceilings, doorways, and beds, as well as consuming an 8,000 calorie count daily are two of his big concerns.
Marshall is currently being recruited and fought over by several different colleges. He’s been chosen to play for the Welsh national team. While nobody has determined what caused him to grow so tall, Marshall is riding the basketball wave and loving every minute of it. In good time, he will have to select a college to attend and play for. It’s a fun time for him.
His mother stands at a tall 5′ 11″ and his father at 6′ 10″. The tallest British man to record is 7′ 7″ and Marshall quite possibly could pass him as his grow continues throughout his teenage years.

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